Part D: Statements of
Service Provision

7
Waka
Transport

Connecting people and places.

In this section

This section includes, for the following groups of activities, what we do; the rationale – why we do it; the service offering; key projects and programmes; how the activities are funded and how much they cost; any significant negative effects; and the level of service we expect to provide, with performance measures that demonstrate what you can expect as part of that level of service.

The key groups of activities under this strategic area are:

7.1 Transport

7.2 Parking

What we do – an overview

Note: GWRC manages the Metlink public transport network with support from central government. Wellington City Council supports public transport options by maintaining and developing bus routes and bus shelters.

Why we do it

Alignment with our long-term city outcomes

People-centred city
We strive to enable Wellingtonians to travel by their choice of mode and experience a high level of safety and convenience.

Eco city
We encourage walking, cycling and public transport use to reduce the impact of our transport system on the environment.

Connected city
A high-quality and efficient transport system means people and goods can get where they need to be, when they need to be there.

Dynamic central city
We strive to deliver a transport system that enables people from around the Wellington region to access our compact central city – a system that allows Wellingtonians and visitors to walk around, explore and enjoy the vibrant nature of our city.

Alignment with the priorities in Our 10-Year Plan

Resilience and environment
A transport system that is resilient to earthquakes and storm events is essential to a thriving city that recovers quickly after an event.

Transport
World-class cities have effective and efficient transport systems. It is for this reason that transport is one of our five priorities for this plan. The initiatives driven by this priority aim to improve our productivity, enhance our ‘sense of place’ as a city, add to our quality of life and reduce our carbon footprint.

Snapshot

Our direction

Outcome indicators

We use outcome indicators to monitor progress towards our outcomes over time. This provides us with information on trends that may influence our performance, including those outside our control. As these indicators are at least partially outside of our control, we do not set targets for outcome indicators but instead we will monitor and report on trends over time.

The below is a summary of the outcomes we are monitoring over time. The full list of indicators that inform these outcomes for the transport area are included at the end of the transport section.

What this tells us:

Positive trends in the results of these outcome indicators will give us assurance that people are able to get around the city safely, efficiently and reliably and that they have a choice of viable modes by which to travel. A successful transport system is one that facilitates a healthy and happy Wellington.

7.1 Waka Transport

An efficient transport network that gives our people choices about how to get where they need to go is critical to the city’s economy and quality of life.

A priority for this plan will be implementing the preferred options from the Let's Get Wellington Moving (LGWM) programme, which is focused on the inner city – the Ngauranga-to-airport corridor. Together with our partners – Greater Wellington Regional Council (GWRC) and the NZ Transport Agency (NZTA) – we aim to create a transport system that:

Continuing our active transport programme and providing essential services will support the LGWM programme to achieve these objectives.

Activities in this group

  • 7.1.1 Transport planning
  • 7.1.2 Vehicle network
  • 7.1.3 Cycle network
  • 7.1.4 Passenger transport network
  • 7.1.5 Pedestrian network
  • 7.1.6 Network-wide control and management
  • 7.1.7 Road safety

Rationale

  • So our transport networks are reliable. We aim to provide a transport network that provides people with accessible, safe and reliable transport choices.
  • To increase mode share and reduce emissions. We strive to encourage and enable greater use of active modes and passenger transport – increasing the efficiency of the network and reducing the impact of emissions from the transport system.
  • For road safety. Delivering a safe road network is a fundamental goal of our transport strategy. We provide and maintain safety assets and lead road education and promotion activities.

Services we provide

Key projects/programmes

Driven by our priority to improve the transport system, we will deliver on the LGWM programme, continue to improve infrastructure for people walking or cycling, while also delivering our essential services well.

Let’s Get Wellington Moving

Through this programme, which we’re delivering in partnership with GWRC and NZTA, we’ve engaged with the community on scenarios to improve all forms of transport in the city. The community was consulted on four scenarios in late 2017. Detailed information on these scenarios can be found at http://getwellymoving.co.nz/our-scenarios/

The choices are:

LGWM is expected to be supported by a programme of minor safety improvements and safe speed limits at an estimated cost of $13.3 million over 10 years. Further details on this programme are included below. Travel demand management measures are also expected to support LGWM. The programme of travel demand management measures has not been confirmed, but aims to influence travel behaviour to optimise the transport system through a mix of potential measures, such as:

The feedback received from the community to date will be worked through in the coming months and a preferred option presented to decision-makers in May. The investment is likely to set a new level of service, and what this service looks like will depend on which option is progressed.

We’re including a provisional figure in Our 10-Year Plan budget. This would see $3.3 million of operational expenditure over the next 3 years for design and feasibility work, as well as a provisional $122.8 million of capital expenditure from 2022 to 2028. Once a final decision has been made later in 2018, and we’ve worked out the funding in detail, we will amend Our 10-Year Plan accordingly.

Cycling programme

We will invest $74.6 million to deliver the Cycling Master Plan over a 20-year period. This will result in a higher level of service for people on bikes – encouraging more people to cycle and get active, and help reduce congestion. We expect a contribution from NZTA of around $33 million.47

It is expected that NZTA's National Land Transport Programme, which is due by 31 August 2018, will support and encourage faster delivery of safe cycling infrastructure. The cycling programme will continue to be reviewed particularly with a view to bringing forward delivery in the north and west of the city.

As cycling improvements in the city centre are being considered as part of the LGWM programme, this project relates to cycling improvements outside the city centre only. The work includes:

We’re also contributing $5 million of funding in years 2–3 towards the Great Harbour Way project, which is being led by NZTA.

Transport network – resilience

Being able to get goods and people around, in and out of our city after seismic or storm events is part of being a resilient city. Parts of the transport network are on steep hills that require substantial retaining structures and tunnels, and our transport network is also susceptible to damage from storm events. Strengthening our infrastructure and clean-ups following storms are projects driven by our resilience priority.

Transport network

Safer roads – minor safety improvements and safer speed limits

As this is an annual fund that is used to address safety risks, this programme may adapt as safety issues arise. The following are examples of potential initiatives being considered for years 1–3 of the plan:

How it will be funded

This graphic demonstrates the balance of funding sources for the transport group of activities. It shows that these activities are funded through general rates (84 percent), subsidies and grants (11 percent) and fees and user charges (5 percent).

What it will cost

This graphic illustrates the planned capital and operational expenditure for the transport group of activities. It shows regular operational expenditure with significant capital expenditure, particularly from year 5, relating to the LGWM programme. Detail on the expenditure can be found in the projects and programmes budget tables from page 185.

What you can expect from us – performance measures

We use performance measures to track how well we are delivering services against targets.

Please note the following when reading these measures.

7.1 Transport network
Performance measure Previous year target (2017/18) Target 2018-28
Network condition and maintenance    
Roads (%) that meet smooth roads standards* – high volume and regional roads 70% (all roads)48 85%
Roads (%) that meet smooth roads standards* – all other roads 70% (all roads)49 75%
Structures (%) that have been condition rated in the past 5 years – walls New 100%
Structures (%) that have been condition rated in the past 5 years – bridges and tunnels New 100%
Structures (%) in serviceable (average) condition or better – walls 90%50 97%
Structures (%) in serviceable (average) condition or better – bridges and tunnels New 100%
Residents (%) satisfied with street lighting in the central city 85% 85%
Residents (%) satisfied with street lighting in suburbs 75% 75%
Requests for service (%) response rate – urgent within 2 hours* 100% 98%
Requests for service (%) response rate – non-urgent within 15 days* 100% 98%
Footpaths (%) in average condition or better (measured against WCC condition standards*) 97% 96%
Sealed local road network (%) that is resurfaced* 10% Target range 8.9-9.9%
Residents (%) satisfied with the condition of local roads in their neighbourhood 75% 75%
Active modes promotion    
Number of pedestrians entering and leaving the CBD New inc on last year
Number of cyclists entering and leaving the CBD New inc on last year
Network safety    
Residents (%) who are satisfied with walking on the transport network New 75%
Residents (%) who are satisfied with cycling on the transport network New 75%
Network efficiency and congestion    
Residents (%) who think peak travel times are acceptable New Majority
Peak travel times between CBD and suburbs (Kaori, Johnsonville, Island Bay and Miramar) New Each route <25min
Enabling passenger transport    
Inbound bus stops (%) that have a shelter (co-delivered with GWRC) New Baseline
Wellington Cable Car Limited    
Total passenger trips 1,091,928 1,135,246
Cable car user satisfaction survey – tourist (%) satisfaction (respondents who provide a rating greater than 6 on a 1-10 scale) New 91%
Total income ($) $3,050,749 $3,520,749
Cable Car reliability (%) 99% 99%
Non-council revenue earned ($) No previous target Trend
Council capital grant ($) No previous target Trend
Total cost to Council incl. grant + property costs ($) No previous target Trend

Baseline targets – as some of these measures are new, the first year of the plan will be used to establish a ‘baseline,’ which will then allow us to set targets.

Trend targets – where the target is set as ‘trend’, this is an indicator that we will monitor over time but have not set a target.

  *denotes mandatory measures

Key challenges and negative effects

Council activities are carried out in order to maintain or improve the wellbeing of Wellingtonians and visitors to Wellington. Some of these activities may have some negative effects that need to be managed or mitigated.

Activity Key challenges and/or negative effects Mitigation
7.1 Transport

With any transport network there are potential negative effects:

  • Environmental effects. These range from carbon emissions to air and noise pollution to surface water run-off from roads that may carry contaminants into the stormwater system. These impacts are directly linked to the number of vehicles on the road and to the availability of option other than using the private car, such as public transport, walking and cycling.
  • Construction effects. Individual projects, such as the construction of a new road, can affect public transport and general traffic flows, neighbouring properties (noise, dust) and nearby businesses (access to car parking and premises).
  • Development effects. The timing of transport investment can affect growth opportunities, such as new residential development.
  • Safety. The transport network brings pedestrians, cyclists and vehicles together, which presents hazards to users.

We mitigate the environmental effects of transport by ensuring walking, cycling and public transport are appropriately catered for so that our residents and visitors have choices other than the private car.

We monitor the effects of stormwater run-off on aquatic environments.

We communicate with businesses and affected communities to minimise disturbances due to roadworks.

Through our land use planning, we make sure more people can live close to services and places of employment, thus reducing their need to travel. We also work with developers to coordinate investment in roads with new residential and other developments, particularly in growth areas.

We have developed road safety programmes and design solutions to reduce the likelihood and severity of accidents.

7.2 Tūnga waka ParkingTop

We provide parking to facilitate convenient access to the city by vehicle for residents, local businesses and customers.

Activities in this group

  • 7.2.1 Parking

Rationale

  • To enable people to shop, work and access recreation activities. Central city car and motorbike parking is important for people accessing the city. The provision of parking helps make Wellington a liveable and prosperous city.

Services we provide

Key projects/programmes

How it will be funded

This graphic demonstrates the balance of funding sources for the parking group of activities. It shows that these activities are funded completely through fees and user charges.

What it will cost

This graphic illustrates the planned capital and operational expenditure for the parking group of activities. It shows expenditure is predominantly operational with a small proportion of regular capital expenditure. Detail on the expenditure can be found in the projects and programmes budget tables from page 185.

What you can expect from us – performance measures

We use performance measures to track how well we are delivering services against targets.

Please note the following when reading these measures.

7.2 Parking
Performance measure Previous year target (2017/18) Target 2018-28
Efficiency    
Gross profit (%) used to fund wider transport services New 100%
Equity    
Residents (%) who perceive that parking enforcement is fair Increase from previous year >50%
Availability    
Parking areas with 85% or less car park occupancy during weekdays 75% (on-street car-park average occupancy)51 <85%
Parking areas with 85% or less car park occupancy during weekends 75% (on-street car-park average occupancy)52 <85%
Residents (%) satisfaction with the availability of on-street car parking New 70%

Key challenges and negative effects

Council activities are carried out in order to maintain or improve the wellbeing of Wellingtonians and visitors to Wellington. Some of these activities may have some negative effects that need to be managed or mitigated.

Activity Key challenges and/or negative effects Mitigation
7.2 Parking We do not anticipate any significant negative effects associated with the provision of these services. -

Outcome indicators – Transport

We use outcome indicators to monitor progress towards our outcomes over time. This provides us with information on trends that may influence our performance, including those outside our control. As these indicators are at least partially outside of our control, we do not set targets for outcome indicators but instead we will monitor and report on trends over time.

Outcome measures Desired trend
Network efficiency and reliability  
Residents’ perceptions that peak traffic volumes are acceptable Increasing
Residents’ perceptions that the transport system allows easy access to the city Increasing
Residents (%) who agree the transport system allows easy movement around the city – vehicle users and pedestrians Increasing
Mode of resident travel – daily commute (car, motorbike, bus, train, bicycle, walk, scooter)  
Commute by car Decreasing
Commute by other modes Increasing
Active mode promotion and public transport support  
Residents’ perceptions that cycling is safe in the city: 1) for themselves; 2) for their children (if applicable) Increasing
Residents’ perceptions of quality, reliability and affordability of public transport services Increasing
Proportion of school children walking, cycling or scootering to school Increasing
Environmental impact and safety  
Air quality monitoring (i.e nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide and particulate matter peaks) Increasing
Change from previous year in the number of road crashes resulting in fatalities and serious injury* Decreasing
Social cost of crashes Decreasing
Personal risk of serious injury or fatality for all road users, pedestrians, and cyclists Decreasing
Residents’ perceptions of transport-related safety issues (ie issues of most concern) Decreasing
*denotes mandatory indicators
What this tells us:
Positive trends in the results of these outcome indicators will give us assurance that people are able to get around the city safely, efficiently and reliably and that they have a choice of viable modes by which to travel. A successful transport system is one that facilitates a healthy and happy Wellington.
47NZTA funding for the first 3 years of the programme, across all activities, will be confirmed in August 2018. For years 4–10, we have made assumptions on the level of NZTA funding toward transport activities based on future funding assistance rates of 51% for eligible expenditure. See the ‘Significant forecasting assumptions’, as part of Our 10-year Plan supporting documents for further detail on these assumptions.
48This measure has been revised – previous measure recorded % of all roads (high volume, regional and all other roads) that meet smooth road standards
49This measure has been revised – previous measure recorded % of all roads (high volume, regional and all other roads) that meet smooth road standards
50This measure has been revised – previously recorded sea wall and retaining wall condition rating – walls rated 3 or better
51This measure has been revised – previously recorded on-street car-park average occupancy
52This measure has been revised – previously recorded on-street car-park average occupancy