Part D: Statements of
Service Provision

5
Pāpori me te hākinakina
Social and recreation

We aim for strong, healthy communities.

In this section

This section includes, for the following groups of activities, what we do; the rationale – why we do it; the service offering; key projects and programmes; how the activities are funded and how much they cost; any significant negative effects; and the level of service we expect to provide, with performance measures that demonstrate what you can expect as part of that level of service.

The key groups of activities under this strategic area are:

5.1 Recreation promotion and support

5.2 Community support

5.3 Public health and safety

What we do – an overview

Why we do it

Alignment with our long-term city outcomes

People-centred city
A city is only as strong as its people. Wellington is built on strong communities. It’s a safe city where people have plenty of opportunities to fulfil their potential and connect with each other.

As the city’s biggest provider of recreation facilities and social housing, we aim to promote healthy lifestyles and build strong communities.

We want Wellington to be an inclusive, safe city where participation in city life can be achieved by all.

Alignment with the priorities in Our 10-Year Plan

Housing
We want a city where everyone is well housed. For some sectors in society it is becoming increasingly difficult to live in the city because of housing cost and quality. We can do more. Initiatives in this area aim to reduce street homelessness and improve provision of social housing for those who struggle to find and afford appropriate housing in the market.

Snapshot

Our direction

Outcome indicators

We use outcome indicators to monitor progress towards our outcomes over time. This provides us with information on trends that may influence our performance, including those outside our control. As these indicators are at least partially outside of our control, we do not set targets for outcome indicators but instead we will monitor and report on trends over time.

The below is a summary of the outcomes we are monitoring over time. The full list of indicators that inform these outcomes for the social and recreation area are included at the end of the social and recreation section.

What this tells us:

Desirable trends in these outcome indicators would mean that Wellingtonians have access to recreation opportunities, safe and affordable housing, and feel the benefits of living in a connected and resilient community. We want Wellingtonians to have a high quality of life, be fit, happy and accepted.

5.1 Whakatairanga mahi ā rēhia Recreation promotion and support

The Council provides a range of recreation and leisure facilities to encourage active and healthy lifestyles and enable participation in sporting and other group activities. Through the promotion and support of recreation opportunities we contribute to the development of strong, healthy communities and a high quality of life for Wellingtonians.

Activities in this group

  • 5.1.1 Swimming pools
  • 5.1.2 Sportsfields
  • 5.1.3 Recreation programmes
  • 5.1.4 Recreation centres
  • 5.1.5 Recreation partnerships
  • 5.1.6 Playgrounds
  • 5.1.7 Marinas
  • 5.1.8 Golf course

Rationale

  • To encourage active and healthy lifestyles. Our swimming pools, sportsfields and other recreation centres provide access to sport and recreation opportunities, which are important for people’s health and wellbeing.
  • To enable participation in sporting and other group activities. Our recreation facilities give sporting and recreation groups a space to organise sport and recreation programmes.
  • For social cohesion and connectedness. Our recreation facilities provide important community focal points and recreation opportunities that bring people together.

Services we provide

Key projects/programmes

Year 1–4

Year 5–10

Ongoing programmes

How it will be funded

This graphic demonstrates the balance of funding sources for the recreation promotion and support group of activities. It shows that the majority of these activities are funded through general rates (69 percent), fees and user charges funds 28 percent and a small proportion funded through general rates (3 percent).

What it will cost

This graphic illustrates the planned capital and operational expenditure for the recreation promotion and support group of activities. It shows that expenditure in this area is predominantly operational with a smaller proportion of regular capital expenditure. Detail on the expenditure can be found in the projects and programmes budget tables from page 185.

What you can expect from us – performance measures

We use performance measures to track how well we are delivering services against targets.

Please note the following when reading these measures.

5.1 Recreation promotion and support
Performance measure Previous year target (2017/18) Target 2018-28
High-quality experience    
User satisfaction (%) – pools 90% 90%
User satisfaction (%) – recreation centres including ASB Sports Centre 90% 90%
User satisfaction (%) – sportsfields (grass and artificial) 85% 85%
Scheduled sports games and trainings (%) that take place (all sportsfields) 80% (winter); 90% (summer)26 Baseline
Utilisation    
Artificial sportsfield (%) utilisation – peak winter 80% 80%
Artificial sportsfield (%) utilisation – peak summer 40% 40%
Artificial sportsfield (%) utilisation – off-peak winter 25% 25%
Artificial sportsfield (%) utilisation – off-peak summer 20% 20%
Swimming pool visits (by facility) 1,277,000 1,318,00027
Marinas occupancy (%) 96% 96%
Recreation centre visits (including ASB Sports Centre) 1,070,000 1,155,00028
ASB Sports Centre court space utilisation (%) – peak 46% (peak and off-peak)29 65%
ASB Sports Centre court space utilisation (%) – off-peak 46% (peak and off-peak)30 50%
Number of uses of Leisure Card New 145,00031
Berhampore Golf course users (TBC) New Baseline
Affordability
Residents’ perception that pool admission charges are affordable New Baseline
Ratepayer subsidy per swim New Baseline
Ratepayer subsidy per court/hour (ASB Sports Centre) New Baseline
City recreation promotion    
Number of international and national events at Council recreation facilities and estimated attendees New Baseline
Basin Reserve Trust    
Basin Reserve - Total event days (excluding practice days) 88 (forecast actual 2017/18) 96
Attendance at all events 40,000 (forecast actual 2017/18) 41,000
Practice facility usage days 100 100
Number of function days 25 25
Event income No previous target Trend 
Operational grant per attendance No previous target Trend 
Non-council revenue earned ($) No previous target Trend 
Council operating grant ($000) No previous target 659
Total revenue earned ($000) No previous target 1,005

Baseline targets – as some of these measures are new, the first year of the plan will be used to establish a ‘baseline,’ which will then allow us to set targets.

Trend targets – where the target is set as ‘trend’, this is an indicator that we will monitor over time but have not set a target.

Key challenges and negative effects

Council activities are carried out in order to maintain or improve the wellbeing of Wellingtonians and visitors to Wellington. Some of these activities may have negative effects that need to be managed or mitigated.

Activity Key challenges and/or negative effects Mitigation
5.1 Recreation promotion and support There are negative effects from owning and managing buildings and other assets to deliver these services. These include waste, direct energy use to operate the buildings, indirect energy use, and emissions from people using private transport to access our facilities. Our operations are managed so that waste is minimised or recycled and energy and water is conserved. We also encourage the use of public transport, walking and cycling as a means of getting to places of recreation
  Our swimming pools pose the additional risk of drowning. We manage this risk through a number of steps, most notably through the continuous presence of trained lifeguards. We also offer learn to swim programmes.

5.2 Tautoko hāpori Community supportTop

By providing libraries, community centres and social housing we foster diverse and inclusive communities and enable people to connect with information and each other.

We provide a wide range of facilities forming part of the city’s ‘hard’ social infrastructure that support community wellbeing. These include libraries, community spaces and social housing.

Activities in this group

  • 5.2.1 Libraries
  • 5.2.2 Access support (Leisure Card)
  • 5.2.3 Community advocacy
  • 5.2.4 Grants (social and recreation)
  • 5.2.5 Social housing
  • 5.2.6 Community centres and halls

Rationale

  • To foster diverse and inclusive communities. Our community facilities are places for groups to come together – strengthening social cohesion, celebrating diversity and making the city a more appealing and welcoming place to live.
  • To enable people to connect with information and with each other. Our community facilities are places of discovery and learning that allow people to connect with others and exchange knowledge through events and other activities.

Services we provide

Key projects/programmes

Housing supply

The strategy provides a framework for the Strategic Housing Investment Plan, as discussed below, as well as housing development initiatives, as discussed in the urban development chapter from page 105. The full strategy can be found online at www.wellington.govt.nz/housingstrategy

Housing quality

Community support

 
 

How it will be funded

This graphic demonstrates the balance of funding sources for the community support group of activities. It shows that these activities are funded through general rates (47 percent), fees and user charges (44 percent) and a small proportion funded through targeted rates (9 percent).

What it will cost

This graphic illustrates the planned capital and operational expenditure for the community support group of activities. It shows that expenditure in this area is predominantly operational with some significant capital expenditure in the latter half of the plan relating to the housing upgrade programme. Detail on the expenditure can be found in the projects and programmes budget tables from page 185.

What you can expect from us – performance measures

We use performance measures to track how well we are delivering services against targets.

Please note the following when reading these measures.

5.2 Community support
Performance measure Previous year target (2017/18) Target 2018-28
Libraries experience    
User satisfaction (%) with library services 90% (satisfaction with services and facilities)32 90%
User satisfaction (%) with library facilities 90% (satisfaction with services and facilities)33 Baseline
User satisfaction (%) with library collection (physical) New 75%
User satisfaction (%) with library collection (e-library) 75% 80%
Libraries utilisation    
Library items issued (physical) 3,000,000 (total items issued)34 Baseline
Library items issued (e-library) 3,000,000 (total items issued)35 320,00036
Estimates of attendees of library programmes New 74,00037
Library physical visits 2,400,000 2,500,00038
Library website visits 2,500,000 3,200,00039
Residents (%) who are active library users 75% (registered members)40 75%
Libraries amenity    
Customers (%) who think the library helped them to gain new knowledge and skills New Baseline
Customers (%) who think the library helped them to connect with others and ideas New Baseline
Customers (%) who think the library helped them to improve their job and earning potential New Baseline
Customers (%) who think the library contributed to their sense of belonging in the community New Baseline
Libraries affordability    
Cost to the ratepayer per library transaction New Baseline
Community centres utilisation    
Occupancy (%) of Council community centres and halls 45% 45%
Community advocacy    
Homelessness – % of known street homeless people supported by agencies New Baseline
Funding success    
Grants outcomes (%) achieved (through funded outcomes – four out of five – being met) – Social and Recreation Fund 95%41 80%
Housing quality and usage    
Tenant satisfaction (%) with services and facilities 90% 90%
Tenant rating (%) of the overall condition of their house/apartment (average, good, and very good) 90% 90%
Tenant (%) sense of safety in their complex at night 75% 75%
Occupancy rate of available housing facilities 90% 90%
All tenants (existing and new) housed within policy 98% 98%
Housing upgrade project    
Agreed milestones, design standards and budgets are met in accordance with the agreed works programme and Deed of Grant between the Crown and the Council To achieve To achieve

Key challenges and negative effects

Council activities are carried out in order to maintain or improve the wellbeing of Wellingtonians and visitors to Wellington. Some of these activities may have negative effects that need to be managed or mitigated.

Activity Key challenges and/or negative effects Mitigation
5.2 Community support There are negative effects from owning and managing buildings and other assets to deliver these services. These include waste and direct water and energy use to operate buildings. We seek to minimise these negative effects by ensuring our operations are managed effectively, waste is minimised or recycled, and water and energy are conserved.

5.3 Hauora/haumaru tūmatanui Public health and safetyTop

The health and safety of our city are crucial to enabling our city and our people to thrive.

We deliver services that support the health and safety of the city’s communities, and also provide for dignified bereavement and resting places.

We plan for and deliver a citywide welfare response for people during a civil defence emergency.

Activities in this group

  • 5.3.1 Burials and cremations
  • 5.3.2 Public toilets
  • 5.3.3 Public health regulations
  • 5.3.4 City safety
  • 5.3.5 Wellington Regional Emergency Management Office (WREMO)

Rationale

  • To maintain health standards. We promote and maintain health standards through public health regulations and maintenance of our own facilities, such as public toilets.
  • To help people feel safe. We engage in activities that promote individual wellbeing, safe neighbourhoods and a safe inner city. We engage with communities to ensure the city is well prepared for earthquakes and other natural disasters.

Services we provide

Key new projects/programmes

The safety of Wellingtonians during and following a seismic event is crucial to a fast recovery. The 2016 earthquake highlighted some gaps in our ability to recover from an earthquake, and the following safety initiatives are driven by our resilience priority:

How it will be funded

This graphic demonstrates the balance of funding sources for the public health and safety group of activities. It shows that the majority of these activities are funded through general rates (73 percent), with the remainder funded through fees and user charges (27 percent).

What it will cost

This graphic illustrates the planned capital and operational expenditure for the public health and safety group of activities. It shows that expenditure in this area is predominantly operational with a small proportion of capital expenditure each year. Detail on the expenditure can be found in the projects and programmes budget tables from page 185.

What you can expect from us – performance measures

We use performance measures to track how well we are delivering services against targets.

Please note the following when reading these measures.

5.3 Public health and safety
Performance measure Previous year target (2017/18) Target 2018-28
Compliance    
Food registrations – premises (%) inspected within Food Act regulation required time frames (new business and existing businesses) New 100%
Efficiency    
Alcohol licences – high risk premises (%) inspected 100% (medium, high and very high)42 100%
Alcohol licences – high to very high risk premises (%) inspected during peak time 25% (medium, high and very high)43 50%
Alcohol licences – very high risk premises (%) inspected twice during the year New 100%
Timeliness    
Graffiti removal – response time frames (%) met 80% 80%
Dog control – urgent requests (%) responded to within 1 hour 100% 100%
Dog control – non-urgent requests (%) responded to within 24 hours 99% 99%
Public toilets – urgent requests (%) responded to within 4 hours 100% 100%
Public toilets – non-urgent requests (%) responded to within 3 days 95% 95%
Hygiene standard    
Toilets (%) that meet required cleanliness and maintenance performance standards 95% 95%

Key challenges and negative effects

Council activities are carried out in order to maintain or improve the wellbeing of Wellingtonians and visitors to Wellington. Some of these activities may have negative effects that need to be managed or mitigated.

Activity Key challenges and/or negative effects Mitigation
5.3 Public health and safety We do not anticipate any significant negative effects associated with the provision of these services.  

Outcome indicators – Social and recreation

We use outcome indicators to monitor progress towards our outcomes over time. This provides us with information on trends that may influence our performance, including those outside our control. As these indicators are at least partially outside of our control, we do not set targets for outcome indicators but instead we will monitor and report on trends over time.

Outcome measures Desired trend
Access to and participation in recreation and leisure  
% of residents who use Council pools, recreation centres, libraries or other leisure facilities Increasing
Residents’ perceptions that Wellington offers a wide range of recreation activities Maintain
Residents’ frequency of physical activity Increasing
Residents’ perceptions that there are barriers to participating in recreation activities Decreasing
Residents’ health and wellbeing outcomes  
Social housing tenants who report good quality of life Increasing
Number of people who are known to be homeless in the city Decreasing
Activity levels, obesity/health Increasing
Youth participation in sport and recreation Increasing
Resilient and cohesive communities and neighbourhoods  
Residents’ importance of sense of community in local neighbourhood Increasing
Residents’ engaging in neighbourly actions Increasing
Proportion of residents who feel they could rely on their neighbours for support following a natural disaster or other significant event Increasing
Diversity (tolerance measure) Increasing
Social capital – residents who agree with the statement “I have strong social or community networks that I can draw on in Wellington” Increasing
Public health and safety  
Residents’ perceptions – city and community safety issues of most concern Decreasing safety issues
Number of notifications of the most prevalent food and water-borne diseases Decreasing
Food premises – number of cleaning notices and closures per year Decreasing
Residents with access to emergency items at home and workplace/place of education/other daily destination Increasing
What this tells us:
Desirable trends in these outcome measures would mean that Wellingtonians have a high quality of life, are fit, happy and accepted.
26This measure has been revised – previously recorded on summer and winter results separately
27The targets for this measure are 1,318,000 in 2018/19, 1,321,000 in 2019/20 and 1,305,000 in 2020/21
28The targets for this measure are 1,155,000 in 2018/19, 1,165,000 in 2019/20 and 1,178,000 in 2020/21
29This measure has been revised – previously recorded peak and off-peak as a single utilisation figure
30This measure has been revised – previously recorded peak and off-peak as a single utilisation figure
31The targets for this measure are 142,000 in 2018/19, 148,000 in 2019/20 and 151,000 in 2020/21
32This measure has been revised – previously recorded satisfaction with both services and facilities together
33This measure has been revised – previously recorded satisfaction with both services and facilities together
34This measure has been revised – previously recorded both physical and e-library items issued together
35This measure has been revised – previously recorded both physical and e-library items issued together
36The targets for this measure are 320,000 in 2018/19, 340,000 in 2019/20 and 360,000 in 2020/21
37The targets for this measure are 74,000 in 2018/19, 75,000 in 2019/20 and 76,000 in 2020/21
38The targets for this measure are 2.5m in 2018/19, 2.4m in 2019/20 and 2.3m in 2020/21
39The targets for this measure are 3.2m in 2018/19, 3.3m in 2019/20 and 3.4m in 2020/21
40This measure has been revised – previously recorded ‘registered members’
41This measure has been revised – previously recorded proportion of grands funding successfully allocated (through milestones being met)
42This measure has been revised – previously recorded % of medium, high and very high risk premises inspected
43This measure has been revised – previously recorded % of medium, high and very high risk premises inspected during peak time