Part D: Statements of
Service Provision

4
Oranga ahurea
Cultural wellbeing

We aim to strengthen and promote Wellington’s unique cultural identity.

In this section

This section includes, for the following groups of activities, what we do; the rationale – why we do it; the service offering; key projects and programmes; how the activities are funded and how much they cost; any significant negative effects; and the level of service we expect to provide, with performance measures that demonstrate what you can expect as part of that level of service.

There is one activity grouping under this strategic area, it is:

4.1 Arts and cultural activities

What we do – an overview

Why we do it

Alignment with our long-term city outcomes

People-centred city
Arts and cultural activities anchor Wellington’s appeal as a place of creativity, exploration, innovation and excitement, and add to residents’ quality of life.

These activities build a sense of place and provide a welcoming environment for the city’s increasingly diverse population.

Dynamic central city
Our arts and cultural activities enhance Wellington’s vibrancy as a diverse, inclusive, creative, active and eventful place.

Alignment with the priorities in Our 10-Year Plan

Arts and culture
Wellington has a reputation as the cultural capital of New Zealand. However, it faces increasing competition from other cities. To retain our reputation as a cool, edgy capital, we need to reinvigorate our arts and culture scene.

Snapshot

Our direction

Outcome indicators

We use outcome indicators to monitor progress towards our outcomes over time. This provides us with information on trends that may influence our performance, including those outside our control. As these indicators are at least partially outside of our control, we do not set targets for outcome indicators but instead we will monitor and report on trends over time.

The below is a summary of the outcomes we are monitoring over time. The full list of indicators that inform these outcomes for the cultural wellbeing area are included at the end of the cultural wellbeing section.

What this tells us:

If our city’s events are well attended by both Wellingtonians and visitors, it is an indicator that our city is vibrant and providing opportunities for people to connect with each other. This in turn leads to a city that provides a high quality of life.

4.1 Ngohe toi, ahurea hoki Arts and cultural activities

Our city has traditionally been recognised as the cultural capital of New Zealand. This reflects a mix of factors, including the presence of national arts organisations in the city, funding support from the Council, the sense of a supportive citizenry, and a reputation for edgy and interesting arts in the city.

Activities in this group

  • 4.1.1 City galleries and museums (Wellington Museums Trust)
  • 4.1.2 Visitor attractions (Te Papa / Carter Observatory)
  • 4.1.3 Arts and cultural festivals
  • 4.1.4 Cultural grants
  • 4.1.5 Access and support for community arts
  • 4.1.6 Arts partnerships
  • 4.1.7 Regional Amenities Fund

Rationale

  • For city vibrancy and cultural expression. The arts contribute to a vibrant city and provide opportunities for cultural expression, enhancing Wellington’s vibrancy as a diverse, active and eventful place attractive to visitors.
  • To build and maintain a sense of place and identity. Our museums, visitor attractions and events shape Wellington’s sense of place and identity. They celebrate creativity and ideas and increase our understanding of culture, our shared history, science, ourselves and each other.
  • To grow visitation and exposure to creativity and innovation. We aim to grow the numbers of visitors to our attractions, providing ideas and places where people can connect, share what is common and explore what is different and new.

Services we provide

Key projects/programmes

We want to maintain our reputation as the cultural capital of New Zealand, and to achieve this in the face of increasing competition from other cities will require investment. We will invest in a programme – a Decade of Culture – that will emphasise and enhance the city’s unique creative strengths. This coordinated programme will be built around new and existing opportunities and will help the city compete as a cultural destination. Securing this reputation is important to help us continue:

This programme of infrastructure, art, events, theatre, urban design and festivals will ensure all residents can experience the city’s cultural offering. The following will be included:

In this plan, we will also carry out a number of upgrades to existing venues, such as the St James Theatre ($11.8 million of capital expenditure in years 1–2) and the Town Hall ($91.2 million of capital expenditure in years 1–3) to provide the platform for cultural activity in the city. Once these venues have been reinstated the upgrades will present an improved level of service, establishing a music hub for the public in the Town Hall.

We have also budgeted to earthquake strengthen the Bond Store, home of the Wellington Museum, in years 3–4 at an estimated cost of $10 million of capital expenditure. The strengthening work will also include the remodelling of the ground floor of the museum to improve customer experience.

How it will be funded

This graphic demonstrates the balance of funding sources for the arts and cultural group of activities. It shows that the majority of these activities are funded through general rates (69 percent), with targeted rates funding 26 percent and a small proportion funded through subsidies and grants (2 percent) and fees and user charges (3 percent).

What it will cost

This graphic illustrates the planned capital and operational expenditure for the arts and cultural group of activities. It shows regular operational expenditure each year with significant capital expenditure in years 2-5, relating to the movie museum and convention centre. Detail on the expenditure can be found in the projects and programmes budget tables from page 185.
The significant capital expenditure in this area is for the Movie Museum and Convention Centre. Capital expenditure for earthquake strengthening of existing cultural facilities is included in ‘Urban development’.

What you can expect from us – performance measures

We use performance measures to track how well we are delivering services against targets.

Please note the following when reading these measures.

4.1 Arts and cultural activities
Performance measure Previous year target (2017/18) Target 2018-28
High-quality events    
Attendees (%) satisfied with Council-delivered arts and cultural festivals 90% 90%
Estimated attendance at WCC-supported and delivered events. 500,000 trend
Arts and cultural sector support    
Users (%) satisfied with Toi Pōneke facilities and services 90% 90%
Funding success    
Grant outcomes (%) achieved (through funded outcomes – four out of five – being met) – Arts and Culture Fund 95%24 80%
Wellington Museums Trust25    
Total visitors: 661,500 753,500
City Gallery Wellington 143,000 170,000
Wellington Museum 137,000 132,000
Cable Car Museum 237,000 237,000
Nairn Street Cottage 2,500 2,000
Capital E 90,000 157,500
Space Place 52,000 55,000
Full WCC subsidy per visit ($):    
City Gallery Wellington 18 16
Museums Wellington (including Wellington Museum, Cable Car Museum and Nairn St Cottage) 7 7
Capital E 15 15
Space Place 14 14
Total Revenue (trading and fundraising $000s) 3,644 4,079
Total ownership cost to Council New trend 
Percentage of visitors who rate the quality of their experience (good or very good) No previous target  90%
Trend target — where the target is set as ‘trend’, this is an indicator that we will monitor over time but have not set a target.

Key challenges and negative effects

Council activities are carried out in order to maintain or improve the wellbeing of Wellingtonians and visitors to Wellington. Some of these activities may have negative effects that need to be managed or mitigated.

Activity Key challenges and/or negative effects Mitigation
4.1 We do not anticipate any significant negative effects associated with the provision of these services.  

Outcome indicators – Cultural wellbeing

We use outcome indicators to monitor progress towards our outcomes over time. This provides us with information on trends that may influence our performance, including those outside our control. As these indicators are at least partially outside of our control, we do not set targets for outcome indicators but instead we will monitor and report on trends over time.

Outcome measures Desired trend
Cultural reputation, participation and vibrancy  
Residents’ frequency of engagement in cultural and arts activities Increasing
New Zealanders’ and residents’ perceptions that “Wellington has a culturally rich and diverse arts scene” Increasing
New Zealanders’ and residents’ perceptions that “Wellington is the events capital of New Zealand” Increasing
Proportion of out-of-town (domestic and international) visitors at arts and cultural events and attractions (this measure requires scoping) Increasing
Cultural attraction and event investment success  
Te Papa visitors – total visitors, overseas visitors and New Zealand visitors from outside the region Increasing
Customer (%) satisfaction with the New Zealand Festival Increasing
Total tickets sold to the New Zealand Festival and the proportion sold to customers outside the region Increasing
New Zealand Festival economic return Increasing
Total visits to museums and galleries (including Carter Observatory) Increasing
Community access to venues subsidy: Total numbers of performers at supported events Increasing
Community access to venues subsidy: Total numbers of attendees at supported events Increasing
What this tells us:
If our city’s events are well attended by both Wellingtonians and visitors, it is an indicator that our city is vibrant and providing opportunities for people to connect with each other. This in turn leads to a city that provides a high quality of life.
24This measure has been revised since 2017/18 – previous measure recorded proportion of grants funds successfully allocated (through milestones being met)
25The targets for these measures displayed in the main table are for 2018/19, the year by year targets for the first 3 years of the plan are as follows:

 

2018/19 ($)

2018/19 vistors

2019/20 ($)

2019/20 visitors

2020/21 ($)

2020/21 visitors

City Gallery Wellington

16.05

170,000

16.06

175,000

16.10

178,000

Museums Wellington

7.42

371,000

7.41

374,000

7.84

377,000

Capital E

14.91

157,500

14.61

110,000

10.61

160,000

Space Place

14/22

55,000

13.78

57,000

13.61

59,000