Part D: Statements of
Service Provision

2
Taiao
Environment

We aim to protect and enhance Wellington’s natural environment.

In this section

This section includes, for the following groups of activities, what we do; the rationale – why we do it; the service offering; key projects and programmes; how the activities are funded and how much they cost; any significant negative effects; and the level of service we expect to provide, with performance measures that demonstrate what you can expect as part of that level of service.

The key groups of activities under this strategic area are:

2.1 Gardens, beaches and green open spaces

2.2 Waste reduction and energy conservation

2.3 Water

2.4 Wastewater

2.5 Stormwater

2.6 Conservation attractions

What we do – an overview

Note: There are no material variations in this plan from our assessment of water and sanitary services and waste management plans.

Why we do it

Alignment with our long-term city outcomes

People-centred city
We fund these services because they are critical to the lives of individual Wellingtonians and the community as a whole.

We ensure that the city is safe and liveable, and that basic human needs are met. We also provide recreation opportunities, attract visitors, and make the city a beautiful place to live.

Eco city
Wellington is a city shaped by nature. As the city grows, we aim to preserve the city’s natural beauty. To do this, we engage in activities that protect and enhance our natural environment.

We strive to dispose of waste in sustainable ways, to reduce the city’s greenhouse gas emissions and provide high-quality, accessible green spaces.

Alignment with the priorities in Our 10-year Plan

Resilience and environment
We’ve made resilience a priority. This means investing in our environment, whether we’re dealing with predator species or coastal erosion, and in strengthening our infrastructure, be it pipes or heritage buildings. It means creating stronger communities.

Snapshot

Our direction

Outcome indicators

We use outcome indicators to monitor progress towards our outcomes over time. This provides us with information on trends that may influence our performance, including those outside our control. As these indicators are at least partially outside of our control, we do not set targets for outcome indicators but instead we will monitor and report on trends over time.

The below is a summary of the outcomes we are monitoring over time. The full list of indicators that inform these outcomes for the environment area are included at the end of the environment section.

What this tells us:

Monitoring these trends will allow us to make judgements on how well we are doing in terms of protecting our environment and providing adequate green open spaces.

2.1 Ngā māra, tātahi, whenua pārae, ngahere Gardens, beaches and green open spaces

The city’s parks, gardens and coastlines are a precious resource. They provide spaces for recreation, community gatherings and events.

One-eighth of Wellington’s area is reserve and has been protected for generations. It is a vital and iconic part of Wellington’s landscape, and also supports the city’s response to climate change by acting as a carbon sink.

To ensure these spaces continue to contribute to a high quality of life for all Wellingtonians, we invest to protect, maintain and develop these areas.

The work carried out in this area makes the city’s environment greener and more pleasant for all Wellingtonians – it improves our quality of life and sense of pride in the city. These spaces also make Wellington an attractive place to visit.

Activities in this group

  • 2.1.1 Local parks and open spaces
  • 2.1.2 Botanical gardens
  • 2.1.3 Beaches and coast operations
  • 2.1.4 Roads open spaces
  • 2.1.5 Town belts
  • 2.1.6 Community environmental initiatives
  • 2.1.7 Walkways
  • 2.1.8 Biodiversity (pest management)
  • 2.1.9 Waterfront public space

Rationale

  • To provide access to green open spaces. High quality natural and green environments contribute to off-setting our carbon emissions and enhance Wellington’s sense of place – making it a great place to live, work and play.
  • To provide public places to congregate. Accessible and high-quality open spaces encourage people to gather together, share activities and connect with each other.
  • To provide access to recreational opportunities. These activities provide high-quality open spaces for a wide range of recreation activities, such as walking and mountain biking.
  • To enhance biodiversity. By providing high-quality green open spaces and pest management activities we aim to protect biodiversity, improving the quality of our natural environment and making the city a better place to live, work and play.

Services we provide

Managing and maintaining:

Key projects/programmes

How it will be funded

This graphic demonstrates the balance of funding sources for the gardens, beaches and green open spaces group of activities. It shows that the majority of these activities are funded through general rates (92 percent), with a small proportion funded through fees and user charges (5 percent) and subsidies and grants (3 percent).

What it will cost

This graphic demonstrates the planned capital and operational expenditure on the gardens, beaches and green open spaces group of activities. It shows that expenditure is predominantly operational. Detail can be found in the projects and programmes budget tables from page 185.

What you can expect from us – performance measures

We use performance measures to track how well we are delivering services against targets.

Please note the following when reading these measures.

2.1 Parks, beaches and open spaces
Performance measure Previous year target (2017/18) Target 2018-28
Utilisation    
Number of visitors to the Wellington Botanic Garden and Otari-Wilton's Bush 1,280,000 1,280,000
Number of formal education attendees at Council programmes (School & Community) New Baseline
Attractiveness    
Residents (%) satisfied with the quality and maintenance of green open spaces (local parks and reserves, playgrounds, botanic gardens, beaches and coastal areas, walkways and trails, waterfront, forested areas and green belts) 90% 90%
Protecting and enhancing our biodiversity    
Establish 2 million native plants by 2025 1,690,1276 1,850,9907
Hectares of high-value biodiversity sites covered by coordinated pest management 63%8 Baseline
Affordability    
Cost to the ratepayer per visitor to the Wellington Botanic Garden and Otari-Wilton's Bush New Baseline
Community engagement    
Proportion of households engaged in Council-coordinated pest trapping New Baseline
Number of plants supplied for community planting New 35,000

Key challenges and negative effects

Council activities are carried out in order to maintain or improve the wellbeing of Wellingtonians and visitors to Wellington. Some of these activities may have negative effects that need to be managed or mitigated.

Activity Key challenges and/or negative effects Mitigation
2.1 Gardens, beaches and green open spaces Recreational use of the city’s green open spaces can have negative effects on the immediate environment. In most cases, these are not significant. In our management of the city’s green open spaces, we seek to balance recreation needs against environmental protection.
  Service delivery in a challenging natural environment and managing effects of climate change. Further analysis and investigation needs to be undertaken to understand the effects over the next 30 years. Assets at risk need to be identified and decisions made around reinforcing or removing these assets.

2.2 Tiaki pūngao, whakaheke para Waste reduction and energy conservationTop

Wellington's production of CO2 emissions is low compared with other major cities in New Zealand and Australia, but we can always do more to reduce them further. The Council is committed to being more sustainable. This means that we will reduce our environmental impact by making efficient use of energy, water, land and other resources, shifting towards renewable energy resources, conserving resources and minimising waste.

We manage and monitor landfill operations and composting waste at the Southern Landfill, undertake domestic recycling and rubbish collection services, limit the environmental impact of closed landfills, and undertake programmes to educate residents on how to manage and minimise waste effectively.

Activities in this group

  • 2.2.1 Waste minimisation, disposal and recycling
  • 2.2.2 Closed landfills aftercare
  • 2.2.3 Energy efficiency and conservation

Rationale

  • Reducing environmental impacts. We aim to reduce our impact on the environment by minimising and managing the disposal of waste, by making more efficient use of existing resources, and by shifting toward renewable energy resources.

Services we provide

Key projects/programmes

  • Sewage sludge reduction. We hold resource consent for landfill sewage sludge until 2026. We are looking into technologies to reduce the volume and lower the environmental impact before we renew our resource consents. Bio-solid disposal is problematic due to sheer volume, which will increase with population growth. Investment in this initiative will enable us to maintain the current level of service as our population grows. 

We will undertake planning, design and community consultation in year 3 and have a capital budget allocation of $30.4 million for years 4–5 to implement the preferred option from our investigations.

  • Landfill carbon emission charges. We capture and destroy the methane that is a product of the landfill. This helps to reduce the cost from carbon charges and also produces some electricity through gas conversion. However, some carbon does get released into the environment and so we have to account for carbon charges of $17.8 million over the 10 years covered by this plan.

We are actively pursuing opportunities to reduce carbon emissions across the city through investment in sustainable transport, such as electric vehicle charging and car sharing, by supporting the city to grow in a compact and walkable way and through better management of the city’s waste streams. We will be reviewing the Low Carbon Capital Plan, our carbon reduction strategy, in 2019.

  • Southern Landfill extension. The current landfill is expected to reach full capacity in 5 years. Extension of the landfill is required. We have budgeted $22.7 million over the 10 years of the plan for the extension, which would add 20 years to the expected life of the landfill, with potential to create further capacity if necessary. Future demand will also be managed through continued efforts to reduce the waste that ends up in the landfill. This includes development of on-site infrastructure to support increased waste diversion, resource recovery, as well as replacement of plant and equipment for the compost operations at the landfill.
  • Waste management and minimisation. Through the regional Waste Management and Minimisation Plan, Wellington is committed to reducing the volume of waste disposed of in landfills. The purpose of this plan, which involves all councils in the Wellington region, is to reduce the region’s waste to landfill by one third over the next 9 years. This can't happen in Wellington City until biosolids are removed from the Southern Landfill. We have allocated significant funds to resolving this issue, through the sewage sludge reduction project.

In addition, we plan to use existing waste minimisation funding to investigate with our regional partners how many landfills are needed to service the region. We will also run a trial of a kerbside organic collection in one part of the city, and assess options for processing and marketing processed organic waste. The Council will also develop a business case for a resource recovery centre at the Southern Landfill. We will work with the transport and waste sectors to improve the recovery time of the waste collection system following a natural disaster as well as developing a plan in partnership with Wellingtonians to ensure that Wellington households and businesses have resilient waste systems in the event of an emergency. There are no additional costs for this work at this time.

How it will be funded

This graphic demonstrates the balance of funding sources for the waste reduction and energy conservation group of activities. It shows that the majority of these activities are funded through fees and user charges (96 percent), with a small proportion funded through general rates (4 percent).

What it will cost

This graphic illustrates the planned capital and operational expenditure for the waste reduction and energy conservation group of activities. It shows that expenditure in this area is predominantly operational, with some significant capital expenditure in years 2 to 4, relating to the landfill extension. Detail on the expenditure can be found in the projects and programmes budget tables from page 185.
  The significant capital expenditure in years 2–4 relates to the landfill extension. The capital expenditure for the sludge reduction project is included in the wastewater section.

What you can expect from us – performance measures

We use performance measures to track how well we are delivering services against targets.

Please note the following when reading these measures.

2.2 Waste reduction and energy conservation
Performance measure Previous year target (2017/18) Target 2018-28
Recycling    
Residents (%) who use recycling services regularly 90% 90%
Affordability    
Cost per household (per annum) for kerbside recycling New Baseline
Customer satisfaction    
Residents (%) satisfied with kerbside recycling service 85% 85%
Users (%) satisfied with waste collection service 90% 90%
Sustainable landfill operation    
Estimated efficiency of gas capture system (% of estimated gas produced that is captured and destroyed) New Baseline
Waste minimisation activities    
Volume of waste diverted from landfill 16,500 tonnes 20,000 tonnes9
Number of participants in waste minimisation and education programmes New Baseline
Energy conservation    
Normalised energy cost ($) New Baseline
Normalised amount of energy used (kWh) Declining trend10 Baseline
Estimated energy savings New Baseline
WCC corporate greenhouse gas emissions Reduce emissions by 40%, compared to 2003 emissions Achieve 2050 target

Key challenges and negative effects

Council activities are carried out in order to maintain or improve the wellbeing of Wellingtonians and visitors to Wellington. Some of these activities may have some negative effects that need to be managed or mitigated.

Activity Key challenges and/or negative effects Mitigation
2.2 Waste reduction and energy conservation Waste management has the potential to create leachates and gases. The construction and management of the Southern Landfill is designed to minimise the impact of these. The service is subject to resource consent conditions and is monitored.
  Methane and carbon are products of the landfill.

We capture and destroy the methane, which minimises the impact of the landfill on the environment and generates energy in the process.

Some carbon is still released into the environment. Through our Low Carbon Capital Plan, we aim to reduce carbon emissions throughout the city and reduce the amount of waste generated. We will be reviewing this plan in 2019.

2.3 Waimāori WaterTop

A city needs a steady supply of clean, safe, drinkable water. It’s a resource that’s in limited supply. Before it can be supplied to Wellington households, it has to be gathered in rainwater catchments, stored and treated to ensure it’s free of contamination. It is then piped to Wellington and distributed to every household and business through an extensive network.

This service is managed by Wellington Water Limited, a CCO, which controls and maintains the water network to supply 140 million litres of safe and reliable drinking water per day across the region. A key area of focus in the coming years is security of our water supply and capital expenditure is aimed at increasing water storage in the city to increase our resilience and meet demand from population growth.

Wellington Water has already made a number of crucial investments and improvements after the 2016 earthquake. With funding support from central government, Wellington Water has made sure that key response equipment is now distributed more widely across the region on both sides of the major fault line.

Activities in this group

  • 2.3.1 Water network
  • 2.3.2 Water collection and treatment

Rationale

  • To increase security of potable and stored water. A reliable, resilient, and adequate supply of clean and safe water is critical for the health, wellbeing and prosperity of all residents.

Services we provide

Key projects/programmes

Years 1–4

Years 5–10

Ongoing programmes

Plans to make the regional network more resilient in coming years and to improve the security of supply for Wellington City means that the cost of bulk water is rising. There is planned investment in additional water sources from the aquifer under Wellington Harbour and/or cross harbour pipeline, as a back-up to the existing supply pipe network. While it is GWRC that is planning to make this investment, these costs are passed on to Wellington City Council as operational costs within the bulk water budgets. As a result, the cost of supplying water to Wellington homes and businesses is expected to rise from $17.5 million in year 1 to $32 million by year 10. Overall, we expect to spend $248.6 million over the 10 years for the supply of water to the city.

How it will be funded

This graphic demonstrates the balance of funding sources for the water group of activities. It shows that these activities are completely funded through targeted rates.

What it will cost

This graphic illustrates the planned capital and operational expenditure for the water group of activities. It shows that expenditure in this area is predominantly operational with some significant capital expenditure for each year of the plan also. Detail on the expenditure can be found in the projects and programmes budget tables from page 185.

What you can expect from us – performance measures

We use performance measures to track how well we are delivering services against targets.

Please note the following when reading these measures.

2.3 Water
Performance measure Previous year target (2017/18) Target 2018-28
Clean and safe    
Compliance with Drinking Water Standards for NZ 2005 (revised 2008) (Part 4 bacterial compliance criteria)* 100%11 Compliant
Compliance with Drinking Water Standards for NZ 2005 (revised 2008) (Part 5 protozoal compliance criteria)* 100%12 Compliant
Meeting customer expectations    
Number of complaints about the drinking water’s clarity, taste, odour, pressure or flow, continuity of supply, and supplier responsiveness, expressed per 1000 connections* <13 (2015/16 baseline) <20
Continuity of supply and resolution of faults    
Median response time for attendance for urgent call outs* 60 minutes 60 minutes
Median response time for resolution for urgent call outs* 4 hours 4 hours
Median response time for attendance for non-urgent call outs* 36 hours 36 hours
Median response time for resolution for non-urgent call outs* 15 days 5 days
Water supply interruptions (measured as customer hours) <4 unplanned cuts per 1000 connections (count)13 Baseline
Efficiency and sustainability    
Percentage of real water loss from networked reticulation system and description of methodology used* <14% <17%
Average drinking water consumption resident/day* 375 litres per day 365 litres per day
*denotes mandatory measures

Key challenges and negative effects

Council activities are carried out in order to maintain or improve the wellbeing of Wellingtonians and visitors to Wellington. Some of these activities may have negative effects that need to be managed or mitigated.

Activity Key challenges and/or negative effects Mitigation
2.3 Water Our population is growing and demand on water is increasing. Investment during the 10 years of this plan will provide additional water storage assets in growth areas. Water conservation methods, such as water use restrictions and education, are also under way to manage the growing demand for water.


2.4 Waipara WastewaterTop

The sewerage network, which carries about 30 million cubic metres of wastewater a year, protects human health and the environment by removing wastewater from homes and treating it to make it safe for disposal.

Our key aims are health, safety and sustainability – wastewater should be disposed of in ways that protect public health and don’t compromise ecosystems.

Activities in this group

  • 2.4.1 Sewage collection and disposal
  • 2.4.2 Sewage treatment

Rationale

  • For public and environmental health. The sewerage network is crucial to our city’s health. It provides safe and sanitary removal of sewage waste, and makes sure that the waste is disposed of in ways that minimise harm on the environment and protect public health.

Services we provide

Key projects/programmes

How it will be funded

This graphic demonstrates the balance of funding sources for the wastewater group of activities. It shows that the majority of these activities are funded through targeted rates (97 percent), with a small proportion funded through fees and user charges (3 percent).

What it will cost

his graphic illustrates the planned capital and operational expenditure for the wastewater group of activities. It shows that expenditure in this area is predominantly operational, with the most significant capital expenditure in years 4 and 5 relating to sewage sludge reduction measures. Detail on the expenditure can be found in the projects and programmes budget tables from page 185.
The significant capital expenditure in the years 3–5 of this plan relates to sewage sludge reduction measures. For more information on this, see the ‘Waste reduction and energy conservation’ section in the ‘Environment’ chapter.

What you can expect from us – performance measures

We use performance measures to track how well we are delivering services against targets.

Please note the following when reading these measures.

2.4 Wastewater
Performance measure Previous year target (2017/18) Target 2018-28
Compliance and sustainability    
Dry weather wastewater overflows, expressed per 1000 connections* 0 0
Compliance with the resource consents for discharge from the sewerage system, measured by the number of: 0 breaches14  
Abatement notices   0
Infringement notices   0
Enforcement orders   0
Convictions*   0
Meeting customer expectations    
Number of complaints about the wastewater odour, system faults, blockages, and supplier responsiveness, expressed per 1000 connections* <22 (2015/16 baseline) <30/1000
Continuity of service and resolution of faults    
Number of wastewater reticulation incidents per km of reticulation pipeline (blockages) ≤1.2 ≤0.8
Median response time for wastewater overflows* (attendance time) ≤1 hour ≤1 hour
Median response time for wastewater overflows* (resolution time) ≤6 hours ≤6 hours
*denotes mandatory measures

Key challenges and negative effects

Council activities are carried out in order to maintain or improve the wellbeing of Wellingtonians and visitors to Wellington. Some of these activities may have negative effects that need to be managed or mitigated.

Activity Key challenges and/or negative effects Mitigation
2.4 Wastewater There is the risk of minor overflows into waterways during storm events. The wastewater network and management of the Southern Landfill is designed to minimise the impact of these. The service is subject to resource consent conditions and is monitored.

2.5 Waiāwhā StormwaterTop

Each year, Wellington’s stormwater network carries around 80 million cubic metres of run-off through gutters and drains to the harbour and city streams. The drainage network, managed by Wellington Water, helps protect the city and personal property from flooding as well as protecting public health from the potentially adverse effects of stormwater run-off.

Because stormwater is discharged into the city’s streams, harbour and coastal waters, it needs to be as clean as possible. While we do not treat stormwater run-off, we monitor stormwater discharge at more than 80 sites to ensure it meets the required standards.

As part of development planning and major renewal and upgrade work in the city, we also encourage and will adopt as a Council the implementation of water sensitive urban design solutions to minimise the impact of stormwater run-off and to improve the amenity of the city.

Activities in this group

  • 2.5.1 Stormwater management

Rationale

  • To protect people, property and the environment from flooding and storm run-off. A safe and reliable stormwater network prevents avoidable disruptions to community living and minimises the risk of injury, property damage, and environmental damage.

Services we provide

Key projects/programmes

The severity and frequency of storm events is increasing, and the resilience of our city is dependent on our ability to withstand and recover from these. Planned upgrades to our stormwater network in Tawa, Miramar and Kilbirnie will improve the level of service in these areas, reducing the frequency and severity of floods.

How it will be funded

This graphic demonstrates the balance of funding sources for the stormwater group of activities. It shows that the majority of these activities are funded through targeted rates (99 percent), with a small proportion funded through subsidies and grants (1 percent).

What it will cost

This graphic illustrates the planned capital and operational expenditure for the stormwater group of activities. It shows that operational expenditure accounts for between two thirds and three quarters of the total expenditure. Detail on the expenditure can be found in the projects and programmes budget tables from page 185.

What you can expect from us – performance measures

We use performance measures to track how well we are delivering services against targets.

Please note the following when reading these measures.

2.5 Stormwater
Performance measure Previous year target (2017/18) Target 2018-28
Continuity of service and resolution of faults    
Number of flooding events* No previous target15 Baseline
Number of pipeline blockages per km of pipeline ≤0.5 ≤0.5
Number of habitable floors per 1000 connected homes per flooding event* No previous target16 Baseline
Median response time to attend a flooding event* ≤60 minutes ≤60 minutes
Days (%) during the bathing season (1 November to 31 March) that the monitored beaches are suitable for recreational use 90% 90%
Monitored sites (%) that have a rolling 12-month median value for E.coli (dry weather samples) that do not exceed 1000 cfu/100ml 90% 90%
Compliance with the resource consents for discharge from the stormwater system, measured by the number of: 0 breaches17  
Abatement notices   0
Infringement notices   0
Enforcement orders   0
Convictions*   0
Meeting customer expectations    
Number of complaints about stormwater system performance per 1000 connections* <12 (2015/16 baseline) <20/1000
Residents (%) satisfied with the stormwater system 75% 75%
*denotes mandatory measures

Key challenges and negative effects

Council activities are carried out in order to maintain or improve the wellbeing of Wellingtonians and visitors to Wellington. Some of these activities may have negative effects that need to be managed or mitigated.

Activity Key challenges and/or negative effects Mitigation
2.5 Stormwater The network can carry containments, such as oil from roads or run-off from developments, into waterways. The stormwater network aims to minimise the impact of flooding. We want to reduce the containments that make it into waterways. We educate residents to change behaviours, such as pouring paint down drains, and we monitor our waterways.

2.6 Ngā painga kukume papa atawhai Conservation attractionsTop

The Wellington Zoo Trust and Zealandia (Karori Sanctuary Trust) are both CCOs and are part-funded by the Council.

These attractions tell a story of our past and of our special wildlife. They attract visitors to our city and inform and educate about conservation and biodiversity.

Activities in this group

  • 2.6.1 Conservation visitor attractions

Rationale

  • For conservation and biodiversity. These attractions inform and educate Wellingtonians and visitors about conservation and biodiversity.
  • To attract visitors. These facilities aim to attract tourists to the city, contributing to the local economy.
  • To protect flora and fauna. We strive to protect native and exotic flora and fauna, protecting our natural environment.

Services we provide

Key projects/programmes

How it will be funded

This graphic demonstrates the balance of funding sources for the conservation attractions group of activities. It shows that these activities are completely funded through general rates.

What it will cost

This graphic illustrates the planned capital and operational expenditure for the conservation attractions group of activities. It shows that expenditure in this area is predominantly operational, with significant capital expenditure in line with the key projects identified in years 2-4 and 8-10. Detail on the expenditure can be found in the projects and programmes budget tables from page 185.

What you can expect from us – performance measures

We use performance measures to track how well we are delivering services against targets.

Please note the following when reading these measures.

2.6 Conservation attractions
Performance measure Previous year target (2017/18) Target 2018-28
Wellington Zoo    
Total number of visitors 240,854 244,42018
Education visitors 10,500 10,500
Visitor satisfaction (rating out of 10) New 8.50
Conservation Programme Managed Species (% of total collection) New Trend 
Average WCC subsidy per visitor No previous target  $13.5819
WCC full subsidy per visitor No previous target  $21.73
Total ownership cost to Council New Trend 
Average income per visitor No previous target  $17.21
Ratio of generated Trust income as % of WCC grant No previous target  127%
Zealandia    
Number of visitors 96,500 99,30020
Number of education visits No previous target  8,800
Number of individual memberships No previous target  10,800
Cash subsidy (grant) per visit New $8.8021
Full cost per visitor New $18.84
Average revenue per visitor No previous target  $26.48
Non-WCC grant revenue equating to >75% of overall income No previous target  >75%
Non-Council donations and funding No previous target  $270,000
Membership subscription revenue No previous target  $312,100
Net surplus before depreciation and tax No previous target  $324,000
Trend target – Where the target is set as ‘trend’, this is an indicator that we will monitor over time but have not set a target

Key challenges and negative effects

Council activities are carried out in order to maintain or improve the wellbeing of Wellingtonians and visitors to Wellington. Some of these activities may have negative effects that need to be managed or mitigated.

Activity Key challenges and/or negative effects Mitigation
2.6 Conservation attractions We do not anticipate any significant negative effects associated with the provision of these services.  


Outcome indicators – Environment

We use outcome indicators to monitor progress towards our outcomes over time. This provides us with information on trends that may influence our performance, including those outside our control. As these indicators are at least partially outside of our control, we do not set targets for outcome indicators but instead we will monitor and report on trends over time.

Outcome measures Desired trend
Access to green open spaces  
Residents’ self-reported use of the city’s open spaces – local parks and reserves, botanic gardens, beaches and coastal areas, waterfront and walkways Increasing
Open space land owned or maintained by the Council – total hectares Increasing
Open space land owned or maintained by the Council – square metres per capita Maintain
Environmental health  
City Biodiversity Index indicators Improving
Freshwater biological health (macro invertebrates) – Makara, Karori, Kaiwharawhara, Owhiro and Porirua streams Improving
Freshwater quality – Makara, Karori, Kaiwharawhara, Owhiro and Porirua streams Improving
Native bird counts Increasing
% of city declared predator/pest-free (low density), by species Increasing
Waterway health – proportion of waterway monitoring reporting “good” or better Improving
Renewable energy generation in the city Increasing
Resident engagement in environmental protection and restoration  
Hours worked by recognised environmental volunteer groups and botanic gardens volunteers (survey based) Increasing
Residents engaged in trapping or other predator control Increasing
Water consumption (commercial and residential combined) Decreasing
Energy use per capita Decreasing
Total city greenhouse emissions per capita Decreasing
Residents who state they have taken regular action in the last year to reduce their emissions Increasing
Total kerbside recycling collected per capita (tonnes) Increasing
Tonnes of general waste to landfill per capita Decreasing
What this tells us:
Monitoring these trends will allow us to make judgements on how well we are doing in terms of protecting our environment and providing adequate green open spaces.

6This measure has been revised since 2017/18 – previous measure recorded native trees established.
7The target for this measure increases year by year, the targets for the first three years are 1.65 million plants by end of 2018/19, 1.75 million by end of 2019/20, 1,850,990 by the end of 2020/21, and so on with 2,000,000 plants targeted by 2025.
8This measure has been revised since 2017/18 – previous measure recorded percentage of biodiversity sites covered by coordinated pest management.
9This target represents the target by 2020/21 and for remaining years of the long-term plan. Interim targets are set at 17,500, 2018/19 and 18,500 in 2019/20.
10This is a revised measure since 2017/18 – previous measure recorded WCC corporate energy use
11This measure has been revised since 2017/18 – previous measure was an aggregate of the two drinking water standards compliance measures
12This measure has been revised since 2017/18 – previous measure was an aggregate of the two drinking water standards compliance measures
13This measure has been revised since 2017/18 – previous measure recorded a count of unplanned cuts per 1000 connections
14Revised measure from 2017/18 – previous measure recorded breaches as an aggregate of all abatement notices, infringement notices, enforcement orders and convictions.
15The target has been revised – previously we tracked trend data without a target
16The target has been revised – previously we tracked trend data without a target
17Revised measure from 2017/18 – previous measure recorded breaches as an aggregate of all abatement notices, infringement notices, enforcement orders and convictions.
18The targets for this measure increase year by year, targets for the first three years are 244,420, 246,864, and 249,333
19The targets for this measure increase year by year, targets for the first three years are $13.58, $13.79, and $14.01
20The targets for this measure increase year by year, targets for the first three years are 99,300, 102,200, and 105,200
21The targets for this measure decrease year by year, targets for the first three years are $8.80, $8.54, and $8.28