Part D: Statements of
Service Provision

1
Pārongo ā-tāone
Governance

We aim to build trust and confidence by being open, transparent and accountable.

In this section

This section includes, for the following groups of activities, what we do; the rationale – why we do it; the service offering; key projects and programmes; how the activities are funded and how much they cost; any significant negative effects; and the level of service we expect to provide, with performance measures that demonstrate what you can expect as part of that level of service.

The key groups of activities under this strategic area are:

1.1 Governance, information and engagement

1.2 Māori and mana whenua partnerships

What we do – an overview

Why we do it

Alignment with our long-term city outcomes

People-centred city
Through governance and engagement, we enhance Wellingtonians’ trust and confidence in civic decision-making, and encourage the community to participate in city governance. We provide information about the city and its services to allow Wellingtonians to use and enjoy them.

We promote inclusiveness, we celebrate social and cultural diversity and we respond to the needs and aspirations of Māori. Part of this is in developing the capacity and capability of Māori to engage with Council decision-making.

Eco city
We acknowledge the importance of Wellington’s unique natural environment in our governing role of the city. We aim to minimise our effects on the environment by reducing the emissions of our buildings and services. We work with our communities to ensure Wellington's future as an eco city.

Connected city
In making decisions on behalf of our city, we make sure our people can access networks regionally, nationally and globally, both physically and virtually. We establish city-to-city relationships that support international economic, social and cultural connections, and we provide an environment that encourages collaboration and partnership in the city and regionally.

Dynamic central city
We strive to make decisions that enhance the city’s vibrancy, reflect the diversity of cultures and tell Wellington’s ‘story’, specifically the place of Māori in our story, through the built form and natural heritage of the city.

Snapshot

Our direction

Outcome indicators

We use outcome indicators to monitor progress towards our outcomes over time. This provides us with information on trends that may influence our performance, including those outside our control. As these indicators are at least partially outside of our control, we do not set targets for outcome indicators but instead we will monitor and report on trends over time.

The below is a summary of the outcomes we are monitoring over time. The full list of indicators that inform these outcomes for the governance area are included at the end of the governance section.

What this tells us:

Community involvement in decision-making is key to successful decisions. If residents are satisfied with the level of engagement, we can be confident we are making democratic decisions.

1.1 Kāwanatanga, pārongo me ngā mahi whai wāhi Governance, information and engagement

Our governance activities include managing local elections, informing residents about the city and the issues or challenges it faces, listening to residents’ views and making decisions in the best interests of Wellingtonians.

Our information and engagement activities include being open and talking with people who live in Wellington about the plans and decisions we make for our city.

Activities in this group

  • 1.1.1 City governance and engagement
  • 1.1.2 Civic information
  • 1.1.3 City Archives

Rationale

  • To facilitate democratic decision-making. In carrying out activities to ensure our decision-making is democratic, we aim to enhance residents’ trust and confidence in the Council.
  • To provide open access to information. Easily accessible information allows people to use the city’s facilities. We also provide residents with a point of contact for service problems and other feedback.

Services we provide

Key projects/programmes

How it will be funded

This graphic demonstrates the balance of funding sources for the governance, information and engagement group of activities. It shows that the majority of these activities are funded through general rates (97 percent), with a small proportion funded through fees and user charges (3 percent).

What it will cost

This graphic demonstrates the planned capital and operational expenditure on the governance, information and engagement group of activities. It shows that expenditure is predominantly operational and increases over the 10 years, with peaks every 3 years, in line with local body elections. Detail can be found in the projects and programmes budget tables from page 185.

What you can expect from us – performance measures

We use performance measures to track how well we are delivering services against targets.

Please note the following when reading these measures.

1.1 Governance, information and engagement
Performance measure Previous year target (2017/18) Target 2018-28
Facilitating democratic decision-making    
Meeting and committee agendas (%) made available to the public within statutory time frames 100% 100%
Meeting and committee agendas (%) made available to the public at least 4 days prior to meetings 80%1 70%
Community engagement    
Residents (%) who believe they have adequate opportunities to have their say in Council activities 55%2 45%
Residents (%) who state they are satisfied with how the Council makes decisions 75%3 45%
Providing information and a point of contact    
Contact Centre – contacts responded to within target time frames (calls, emails, web form and FIXiT) 80% (calls within 30 seconds); 100% (emails within 24 hours)4 80%
City Archives – users (%) satisfied with services and facilities New 75%
Residents (%) who agree that Council information is easy to access (via website, libraries, social media, newspapers etc) 60% 55%
Residents (%) who agree that the Council is proactive in informing residents about their city New 70%
Official information requests (%) handled within Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act legislative time frame New Baseline

Key challenges and negative effects

Council activities are carried out in order to maintain or improve the wellbeing of Wellingtonians and visitors to Wellington. Some of these activities may have negative effects that need to be managed or mitigated.

Activity Key challenges and/or negative effects Mitigation
1.1 Governance, information and engagement We do not anticipate any significant negative effects associated with the provision of these services.  

1.2 Rangapū Māori/mana whenua Māori and mana whenua partnershipsTop

As part of our Treaty of Waitangi obligations, we need to ensure mana whenua and Māori meaningfully participate in, contribute to and inform Council decisions. Engagement with the wider Māori community recognises the special provisions for Māori within our legislative framework and their unique position as tangata whenua. Improved partnerships and capacity building are the cornerstones of this engagement.

We strive to ensure the views of mana whenua and Māori are recognised for the benefit of all Wellingtonians. We are guided by the He Waka Eke Noa – Effectiveness for Māori Framework. This establishes the principles of how the Council will work more effectively with and for iwi partners and Māori within the city.

We work with the city’s two mandated mana whenua organisations, Taranaki Whānui ki te Upoko o te Ika and Te Rūnanga o Toa Rangatira Incorporated, to ensure their views are represented in decisions about the city and their contribution to Wellington’s heritage is fully and publicly recognised. The relationship also extends to working together on projects, such as the Shelly Bay development.

Our responsibilities to these organisations are outlined in a recent memorandum of understanding (MOU), signed in March 2017, which focuses on strategic planning at a leadership level – standing side by side, looking to the future together.

Activities in this group

  • 1.2.1 Māori and mana whenua partnerships

Rationale

  • To strengthen our partnerships and recognise the special place of Māori and mana whenua in Council decision-making

Services we provide

Key projects/programmes

How it will be funded

This graphic demonstrates the balance of funding sources for the Māori and mana whenua partnerships group of activities. It shows that 100 percent of the expenditure in this group is funded through general rates.

What it will cost

This graphic demonstrates the planned expenditure on the Māori and mana whenua partnerships group of activities. It shows that expenditure is entirely operational. Detail can be found in the projects and programmes budget tables from page 185.

What you can expect from us – performance measures

We use performance measures to track how well we are delivering services against targets.

Please note the following when reading these measures.

1.2 Māori and mana whenua partnerships
Performance measure Previous year target (2017/18) Target 2018-28
Relationship with mana whenua    
Mana whenua satisfaction with their relationship with Wellington City Council Satisfied Satisfied
The extent to which (how satisfied) mana whenua partners believe (are) that the Council is meeting its obligations under Te Tiriti o Waitangi with respect to Partnership, Protection and Participation (narrative-based measure based on interviews) New Satisfied
Engaging Māori residents in decisions    
Māori residents (%) who believe that they have adequate opportunities to have their say in decision-making 75%5 75%
Promoting Māori culture    
Māori residents (%) who agree that the Council is taking an active role in revitalising te reo Māori and revitalising Māori cultural heritage New 75%

Key challenges and negative effects

Council activities are carried out in order to maintain or improve the wellbeing of Wellingtonians and visitors to Wellington. Some of these activities may have negative effects that need to be managed or mitigated.

Activity Key challenges and/or negative effects Mitigation
1.2 Māori and mana whenua partnerships We do not anticipate any significant negative effects associated with the provision of these services.  

Outcome indicators – Governance

We use outcome indicators to monitor progress towards our outcomes over time. This provides us with information on trends that may influence our performance, including those outside our control. As these indicators are at least partially outside of our control, we do not set targets for outcome indicators but instead we will monitor and report on trends over time.

Outcome measures Desired trend
Residents’ confidence and engagement  
Voter turnout in local elections, referendums and polls Increasing
Residents (%) who believe they have the opportunity to participate in city decision-making Increasing
Māori and mana whenua engagement and confidence  
Mana whenua partners agree that the use and protection of the city's resources for the future is appropriate (our kaitiaki role) Increasing
Māori residents (%) who feel that Māori culture and te reo is appropriately recognised and visible in the city Increasing
Māori residents (%) who believe they have the opportunity to participate in city decision-making Increasing
Diversity  
Diversity of population and residents valuing diversity Increasing
What this tells us:
Community involvement in decision-making is key to successful decisions. If residents are satisfied with the level of engagement, we can be confident we are making democratic decisions.


1This measure has been revised since 2017/18 – previous measure included making the agenda available for elected members 5 days before and for public 4 days before the meeting.
2This measure has been revised since 2017/18 – previous measure recorded satisfaction with the level of consultation.
3This measure has been revised since 2017/18 – previous measure recorded residents who are satisfied or neutral with regard to their involvement with decision-making.
4This measure has been revised since 2017/18 – previous measure recorded response to calls and emails separately.
5This measure has been revised since 2017/18 – previous measure recorded Māori residents who are satisfied or neutral with regard to their involvement with decision-making.